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The Observer

“Love, Death and Robots:” a unique dose of Netflix

TyYonna Kitchen, Columnist

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“Love, Death & Robots” is an interesting show built on the concept of bringing different creators together. Each episode has a different animation style and director which sets audience members up for a new visual storyline every time. At times, Netflix played it fast and loose with the definitions of the words love, death and robots. However, the overall execution was pretty good. Some episodes were great, some were bad and the rest were forgettable or weird.

“Sonnie’s Edge”

This was a good idea. Fighters enter a ring after transferring their minds into their robotic monsters. The twist of the main character, Sonnie, being closer to an entity than a human being was unexpected. My only fault with this episode was the love aspect. It was more of an excuse to reveal the twist of Sonnie’s edge, which is fine. However, Netflix should stop killing gays. The end.

“Three Robots”

This was fun. There were cats and robots, what else can a girl ask for.

“The Witness”

The twist of the two main characters stuck in a loop of murdering one another and witnessing their own murders was cool. I wanted to love this, but watching a terrified woman run away from danger was hard to do since she was naked the whole time. Clothes aren’t a crime and nudity is not edgy. This was a shame since the story had so much potential.

“Suits”

I enjoyed the animation style in this episode. The story was simple and a little less memorable than some of the more powerful episodes, but still fun. I’ve always wanted to see farmers in robot suits versus hordes of aliens and Netflix made that dream come true.

“Sucker of Souls”

This story followed an expedition into a cave. The characters find a monster that is another take on the dracula creature. It was bad and pointless.  I didn’t want this. Dear Netflix, please delete this useless episode.

“When the Yogurt Took Over”

The title of this episode paints a pretty clear picture. I learned about what would happen if yogurt ever took over. Why yogurt? Just because? Alrighty then.

“Beyond the Aquila Rift”

This episode was clearly inspired by bad decision making. Never take the red pill. Stay in your simulations, kids.

“Good Hunting”

This episode could have used less showing and more telling. There were graphic scenes of sexual assault and abuse that I could have done without, but the actual story was pretty creative.

“The Dump”

Who doesn’t love a good dog-like pile of trash? Me, I didn’t love or even like this episode. There was no real point made in the story. There wasn’t even a single robot, just a lot of garbage.

“Shape-Shifters”

Werewolves fight for a military that hates them. The best friend of the main character was slaughtered because war happens. Then the bad werewolves were killed by the trusty main character. He walks off into the sunset with the remains of his buddy’s carcass and then it’s over. Still a better love story than “Twilight.”

“Helping Hand”

The main character pulls off her arm in order to save her own life. Space, anti-gravity, excitement, yay. The title of the episode is, of course, the best part and should be given a one-handed round of applause.

“Fish Night”

I’m going to be completely honest. I do not remember most of this episode. Two men get stranded in a desert, then some pretty animations and beyond that, I have no clue. Not much about this episode was good or bad, but it exists.

“Lucky 13”

I loved this episode and not just because of my undying appreciation for anything that Samira Wiley does. Wiley’s character captains a ship that is seemingly cursed, but the two work well together and share a mutual respect and love for one another. Love can extend to so many subjects without becoming cliché and this episode did this well. The sentence of a machine being conveyed without the ship speaking or becoming cartoonish was also refreshing.

“Zima Blue”

Sure, why not. The animation style was not my favorite, but I did like the story from start to finish. A reporter goes to interview a now deity like artist, Zima. He took over the world after going under many enhancing surgeries and painting the same color over and over again in different shapes. There is also a point to be made that anytime a confusing plot hole is covered up with “and then he became a pool cleaner” I can’t help but smile. It was truly one of the better of the “meh” episodes.

“Blindspot”

Did I watch this? Sure. Do I remember this? Nope, not at all.

“Ice Age”

Inside of a couple’s freezer was an ever-evolving civilization. The story never really picks up after the civilization is discovered.  A couple watches their freezer for over 20 minutes. I watched them watch a freezer for over 20 minutes. What a waste of time. I leave you with this: #FreezerBurn

“Alternate Histories”

It happened and I wasn’t upset once it ended.

“The Secret War”

Everyone dies except for the stupid string-instrument-playing son of the main character. The animation was beautiful and I didn’t mind the robotless storyline.

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“Love, Death and Robots:” a unique dose of Netflix