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Funk Club teaches about 1970s culture, music

Members+of+Funk+Club+learn+about+a+funk+song+and+phrase+of+the+week%2C+in+addition+to+the+social+issues+that+took+place+during+the+1970s+and+their+effect+on+the+music+of%0Athe+era.+The+club+meets+each+Wenesday+in+Black+Hall+101+at+5+p.m.
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Funk Club teaches about 1970s culture, music

Members of Funk Club learn about a funk song and phrase of the week, in addition to the social issues that took place during the 1970s and their effect on the music of
the era. The club meets each Wenesday in Black Hall 101 at 5 p.m.

Members of Funk Club learn about a funk song and phrase of the week, in addition to the social issues that took place during the 1970s and their effect on the music of the era. The club meets each Wenesday in Black Hall 101 at 5 p.m.

Members of Funk Club learn about a funk song and phrase of the week, in addition to the social issues that took place during the 1970s and their effect on the music of the era. The club meets each Wenesday in Black Hall 101 at 5 p.m.

Members of Funk Club learn about a funk song and phrase of the week, in addition to the social issues that took place during the 1970s and their effect on the music of the era. The club meets each Wenesday in Black Hall 101 at 5 p.m.

Emma Johnson, Staff Reporter

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Hippies, bell bottom jeans, the Vietnam War and an era chock full of music. The 1970s was a decade that produced many different styles of music, which some students at CWU are now learning more about.

Student Jake Thomas Mclaughlin started Funk Club because of his love and interest for the 1970s and funk music, but beyond that he also enjoys the fashion and other aspects of the decade. Funk music is a type of music that came out of the 1970s that stemmed from African-American communities, and is a mixture of different types of music that make it easy to dance to.

Mclaughlin spends the club meetings talking about the 1970s and more specifically funk music and the history of funk music. The genre stems from the civil rights movement era and the racial injustices that occurred during the time.

“We have a big teaching session on the 1970s and how funk and soul music brought people together in times of segregation,” Jeremiah Williams, an officer of the club, said.

During the meetings, the club members learn about both a funk song and album of the week, as well as the artists that created the music and their importance to the genre. Mclaughlin teaches a lesson via 30-40 minute documentaries on topics involving social issues that coincided with funk music during the club meetings. Afterwards, they discuss the content.

Bob Hickey, a geography professor at CWU and the advisor for the club, lived through the 1970s.

“I am the only person in the room who listened to the music when it came out,” Hickey said.

At the end of each meeting, the club has a soul train. This lets all of the club members get up and dance to the music they learned about during the meeting, in addition to other music. Some examples of artists the club has talked about so far are Isaac Hayes, Earth, Wind and Fire and The O’Jays. Williams said funk music is what helped keep black people in the 1970s empowered during hard times. Funk club and the music today is still relevant because of the racial issues that people still have to face, Williams said. The club sheds light on the power of the music and message. A song Williams said stood out is “Say It Loud, I’m Black and I’m Proud,” and his favorite lyrics in the song are just that. The James Brown song is an example of the type of lyrics that were produced in 1970s funk. The club meetings are less for academic purposes, and are for people who just want to come and discuss an era, what came of the 1970s for social justice issues and how those who had a voice in the African-American community stood up to injustice.

Funk Club meetings are held in room 150 in Black Hall on Wednesdays at 5 p.m.

“We just want you to come and have a good time,” Williams said.

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